bravery award to a man convicted of domestic violence

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LJ (@lozzjd)06.07.2012 at 4:41 pm

I just found out that a man was given a bravery award for helping in bushfires we had here in Australia. Usually that is a brilliant thing but I dont know what to think about this award that has been given as I have also found out this man was convicted of bashing his partner so badly that she lost and eye and the baby she was carrying.
What are your thoughts on this? I personally do not think this individual deserves the award.

0 votes, posted 06.07.2012 at 4:41 pm
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Anonymous (@)1 year, 10 months ago ago

If the award is for a specific event and not a lifetime achievement, and that specific event merits a bravery award, then I don’t see how one can argue against it, despite how much some of his previous actions might disgust you. It may also be a testament to the ability of a person to change.

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LJ (@lozzjd)1 year, 10 months ago ago

@smalls, I see where you are coming from but I cant seem to get over it.

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DaJetPlane (@lytning91)1 year, 10 months ago ago

@lozzjd, Yes, he deserves the award. He’ll have plenty of time to look at it while he slowly dies alone and is buried by no one but the company hired to scoop up his remains.

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Anonymous (@)1 year, 10 months ago ago

I understand the hesitance to want to bestow an award on someone who could do that. But just thinking objectively about meeting the criteria for an award for bravery makes it a simple matter, if the criteria are met then the award is deserved, if not, then no award. It takes the whole human aspect out of it.

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LJ (@lozzjd)1 year, 10 months ago ago

@lytning91, hehe now thats an interesting way of looking at it. I love your replies

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LJ (@lozzjd)1 year, 10 months ago ago

@smalls, I see what you mean there. I am still a bit funny about it, wich I feel a bit bad about because I like to think I am open minded but some things just push my buttons. I guess I can see both sides really.

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1.61803399 (@drunkmonkmeth)1 year, 10 months ago ago

the good deed doesn’t erase the bad nor the bad the good.

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valentulus (@valentulus)1 year, 10 months ago ago

The crime: I hope he served a lengthy sentence, what he did was murder and then some.

The ‘good deed’: if his intentions were pure, good job to him, perhaps he is a reformed character. Perhaps he had mental issues in the past.

Us human beings are weird creatures and we often hurt those closest to us with our undirected pent up frustration and anger at the world, or caused by the world, and not those who love us. I’ve done this a few years ago in the past, aiming verbal abuse at relatives. I feel ashamed about that and I know they aren’t what was causing my problems at the time – they were actually trying to help. Humans are imperfect. Accept that, and don’t let it bother you, even when their imperfection causes you to become a target of their own undirected negative feelings. I’m not saying you should be anyones bitch, but sometimes (especially with family) it’s better to be the calm, rational, friendly one than the one who starts a screaming match. Take nothing personally.

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LJ (@lozzjd)1 year, 10 months ago ago

an email sent by the woman who was the victim of the man who won the award and her thoughts/feelings since the award has been stripped of him. Does this change anyones view or do you still agree he should not have been stripped of it?
I do see both sides but as I have said previously I just cant agree that he should have a bravery award.

I felt like crying all over again, but this time for a very different reason.

Last night the Royal Humane Society emailed me to say that they had revoked the bravery award they gave to the man who bashed me, left me blind in one eye, and killed my unborn child.

For years, I’ve been reliving what he did to me. And the bravery award just made it all so much worse. He made my life a living hell, leaving me permanently disabled — and yet society was holding him up as a hero.

But that all started to change when I saw Melinda Liszewski’s Change.org petition. Suddenly it felt like people were on my side again, standing with me against what he did. Knowing more than 18,000 people signed Melinda’s petition gave me the courage to publicly speak out.

So yesterday I delivered the 18,961 petition signatures to Melbourne Mayor Robert Doyle (also a Vice President of the Royal Humane Society). I did interviews about the petition on the nightly news for Channel 10, Channel 7, Channel 9 and ABC. I was interviewed on 3AW, and the campaign was covered in the Herald Sun, the Daily Telegraph, the Australian and in lots of other places.

For me this was never about just one award. It was about sending a bigger public message that brave men don’t bash women and that as a community there must be zero tolerance for anyone who commits such a vile act.

Thanks to you, the Royal Humane Society has finally agreed with me. After all of the media coverage yesterday they convened a crisis meeting and voted unanimously to strip him of the award.

By starting this petition on Change.org, Melinda stood up and spoke out when I couldn’t find the strength to. And I can’t thank her enough. This morning, we’re both sharing the news with our friends and family, and you can do the same by sharing this news piece about our victory on Facebook.

With my deepest thanks,

Jeannie Blackburn.

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