in the moment – thinking ahead of time

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Tine (@tine)    1 year, 6 months ago

umm.. this is a little abstract so if i fail in explaining what i mean properly feel free to let me know, to help explain, a cpl examples:

1) a cup falls off the table, the next thing you know the cup is in your hand having caught it in the split second before it hit the ground, you realize you had moved 2 ft, stooped over, and shot your hand out, all without thinking prior,

2) you are going in for a layup, there are two people guarding you, you make it, you realize that you just orchestrated several deceiving dribbles, misleading hip movements, and shot with one hand at an odd angle, all without prior thinking,

so, here is my pondering, is this pure intuition? how i am defining that term is:

“Intuition is the ability to acquire knowledge without inference and/or the use of reason.”

onay inkingthay involvedway

and if so, what is the full spectrum, where does intuition primarily draw its data from to act as an instantaneous reflex without though prior?

and finally, can you actively view the intuition process? i mean, its your brain using what it knows to instantly respond, that means it is simply a function like any other, the logic here seems to then imply that we can activate the processes, perhaps this is what geniuses do.

0 votes, posted 01.17.2013 at 1:11 pm
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Tine (@tine)1 year, 6 months ago ago

i guess the idea here is that your brain is thinking faster than time itself, my assumption is this has something to do with the subconscious and how we can actively drift into it the more we meditate, the subconscious then, is timeless, therefore the more we can actively go into that state, the more we can slow down time,

think about what being in the moment does to your perception of time, something is drawing you fully in, times slows down, everything is vivid,

^this^ but activated at will

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molniser (@molniser)1 year, 6 months ago ago

Hey, interesting stuff!
I think that… (prior warning: I haven’t read one book on psychology :-))

The examples you are describing have little to do with intuition (or at least what I understand under intuition).

Say we use your definition, do you find ‘catching a cup’ = acquiring knowledge?
Didn’t you already have the ‘knowledge’ that the beautiful cup should stay in 1 piece?
Just like in the game of basketball; you already know you’re supposed to score goals and to outwit defenders.

As soon as you see the cup falling, the brain shoots in action: ‘catch it!’ (because I, the brain, know that by catching it, the cup will stay in 1 piece.)
or: ‘do a dribble!’ (because I, the brain, know that’s how you outwit a defender.)

So basically, the examples you described are just examples where your brain processes lots of information (‘cup falls, I’m standing 2 feet away, I should have my hand right…. there, do it now!’)

Intuition — how I see it, but I’m not a psychologist of course — has more to do with *new* situations, where you face a *new* ‘challenge’ and somehow you immediately you feel how you should react like this or that — you feel this without reasoning why you should react like this or that.

I think intuition goes back to past experiences etc, which resemble the *new* situation.

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Edward Bernays (@edwardbernays)1 year, 6 months ago ago

Its actually one of the basic forms of consciousness. Its known as the neocortex in the brain. It deals specifically with action/reaction. It is pertaint to immediate survival. Thoughts that enter your brain either are dealt with by your neocortex (5-10%), and if no immediate reaction is needed they travel to your amygdala (90-95%)… (which is the process of more deeper thoughts).

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winslow (@winslow)1 year, 6 months ago ago

Reaction. As a bball player you have done so many moves over and over again that it becomes natural and mixing them up is easy to do without having to think. Its more of reading the situation and reacting. Its burned into your head so you dont really consciously have to think about it. Like a smoker lighting a cig before they know it.

Catching the cup is different, but some people just have mad skills.

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Anonymous (@)1 year, 6 months ago ago

This is an interesting idea you mention and has allot to do with how you’r brain deceivers information.

A simple example is the way you drive in you’re car, while your mind is focussed on driving and the automation of it becomes more natural in time the attention needed to focus on driving shifts… You’re brain bassicaly has made a set rules of law it needs to perform the task. But in the split second you need to give attention it is there….

You could think of it like this… The brain creates superstructures of all things it needs to handle, when you learn something new, new neurological connections are created using a deep focus. But when things become simpeler the superstructure slinks, becomes smaller and uses less RAM…

People with near death experiences describe sometimes things as being slowed down, these moments the brain becomes bassically superaware. Super aware of possible danger and calculates in split seconds the best outcome for it’s own survival. This beastly instinct and the solutions are mostly the way the brain shuts out possible distractions and soley focus on completing the presented task.

Guys can probably relate to this very simple example… The first time you get hit in the balls learns to never feel that again. So you probably have experienced actions that somehow felt like superpowers to deviate from incoming attack.

Besides this the brain has the ability to shift in gears depending on possible interaction and need to, you can train these things to extent and can get you to do amazing things. In a way the movie “Donnie Darko” shows a very cool visualtion with some psychose truth. Another cool simple example you’ll find in Premium Rush, here a guy quicly looks through all possible angles.

But if you could truly allocate your on RAM without overclocking this would be so cool!

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Brett (@brett)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@tine As far as the basketball example, I think it’s understanding a system as a whole. The ability to see multiple patterns at the same time comes from hours and hours of experience. Robert Greene goes into great detail about this in his book, “Mastery”.

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Tine (@tine)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@molniser,

–Say we use your definition, do you find ‘catching a cup’ = acquiring knowledge? Didn’t you already have the ‘knowledge’ that the beautiful cup should stay in 1 piece?–

you acquire the knowledge to make the motions to catch the cup, umm… before the cup fell you did not know the motions required to catch it before it hit the ground, but in the instant between when it left the elevated surface to when you caught it right before it hit the ground, your brain told your body to do ‘x’ + ‘x’ + ‘x’ without you having to think about it,

you know how to catch, this is where the intuition comes from, but you didn’t how you would specifically place you body in the position to catch the cup prior to the circumstances, all the brain / body commands happened without you thinking,

the intuition that came from knowing how to catch worked faster on deducing what to do and performed a successful action even before the brain consciously registered what just happened, the brain went into overdrive and considered everything it knew about falling speed, angles, weight, size, movement, and direction in less than a split second and sent signals to the body to move without waiting for a command first,

so the process is about how quickly can you pull together abstract pieces of information to form a picture on what to do next, the scenario with the cup was ‘new’, even though catching was not, the ‘how’ was.

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Tine (@tine)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@edwardbernays,

fascinating, are there examples of conscious control over it?

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Tine (@tine)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@winslow,

interesting, so if its about reflex programming, what exercise can be utilized to enhance reaction speed?

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Tine (@tine)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@spiraltouch,

i agree with what you said, it sounds like the major function that operates the process is focus, something i am learning to train through meditation, this is exciting because it adds some validity to the idea of focus control potential.

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Avatar of Tine
Tine (@tine)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@brett,

–Robert Greene goes into great detail about this in his book, “Mastery”.–

hey man, thanks for the reference, i’ll check it out, have any other suggestions?

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Frosty (@iflipvans)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@tine, I sometimes do this thing.. sometimes it’s dangerous.. I call it “Auto-Pilot”. I see a goal and let nothing distract me in achieving it.

This doesn’t usually work for longer than a few hours. If I were to keep it going I would seem like a smug dick.

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Edward Bernays (@edwardbernays)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@tine, Well sure. I mean tonight I dropped a jar of cinnamon from a cupboard above my head and pinned it against my stove with my knee,thus catching it. Just like your example of the cup. Just like flinching. Its basically what we think of as instinctive. You just don’t perceive it as a thought because you didn’t have time to apply reason (via the amygdala). Only afterwards do you apply reason and think, holy fuck I didn’t even think about that i just reacted, but you did think about it, just not in the amygdala. Its all consciousness, just different parts of the brain functioning.

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winslow (@winslow)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@tine, Being in the moment. If youre mind is in another place you will probably never notice the cup is falling.. I dont really know any exercises though.. Just be ready.

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Tine (@tine)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@winslow,

I agree about being in the moment, what so you do to stimulate this?

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winslow (@winslow)1 year, 6 months ago ago

@tine, Sorry I took so long to reply. Its been a wild week in Las Vegas. Anyways.. I just dont worry about the past or the future. I have plans and memories, but whats done is done and what is to come will be here. Thanks for the interest..

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